Use of video-based content in medical education

  • Rowan Duys University of Cape Town
  • Maya Adam Stanford University
  • Sandra Spijkerman University of Pretoria
  • Jessica Purcell-Jones University of Cape Town
Keywords: video-based content, medical education

Abstract

In South Africa, the shortage of trained doctors and nurses contributes to 50% of all maternal deaths, according to the 2014–2016 Saving Mother’s Report of the National Committee on Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths.1 The impact on families and society as a whole,2 in addition to the fact that more than 85% of these deaths are considered preventable, demonstrates the unambiguous scale and urgency of this problem. Broader studies of patient outcomes after surgery in South Africa and the continent confirm the contribution of lack of trained medical staff to our high mortality rates.3–5 We need transformative learning experiences that can be delivered at scale to optimise health professions education in South Africa.1,6 As a leader in technology and innovation in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Africa is optimally poised to design and develop the next generation of scalable, education solutions for the country and the region.

Author Biographies

Rowan Duys, University of Cape Town

Department of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Maya Adam, Stanford University

Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine and Director of Health Education Outreach, Stanford Center for Health Education

Sandra Spijkerman, University of Pretoria

Department of Anaesthesiology, Steve Biko Academic Hospital and University of Pretoria, South Africa

Jessica Purcell-Jones, University of Cape Town

Department of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Published
2019-05-28
Section
Editorial