Management for failed back surgery syndrome: three-in-one procedure versus percutaneous spinal fixation alone

  • Ahmed Abdalla Mohamed Cairo University
  • Atef Kamel Salama Cairo University
  • Ahmed Essam Salem Tanta University
  • Ashraf El Gallad Zagazig University
Keywords: failed spinal surgery, percutaneous facet radiofrequency, percutaneous spinal fixation

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the short-term outcome of a 3-in-1 procedure including percutaneous facet radiofrequency, percutaneous spinal fixation and steroid with hyaluronidase enzyme injection versus percutaneous spinal fixation alone for cases with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Patients and methods: The study included 50 patients who had had previous spinal surgery since a mean duration of 39.7 ± 8.5 months and developed recurrent back pain since a mean duration of 10 ± 2.1 months. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group A underwent percutaneous spinal fixation only and group B underwent the 3-in-1 procedure. Outcome was evaluated at the end of six months postoperatively (PO) using a pain numeric rating scale (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Odom’s criteria for evaluation of surgical outcome with evaluation of patients’ satisfaction by outcome. Results: All patients showed progressive decrease of NRS pain and ODI scores compared with preoperative scores. However, patients in group B showed significantly lower postoperative NRS pain scores and ODI with significantly higher frequency of patients having had > 50% reduction of both scores compared with patients in group A. PO analgesic consumption rate in both groups was significantly lower than the preoperative rate with a significant reduction of mean total scoring compared with preoperative scoring. The frequency of patients who found the provided therapeutic procedure satisfactory and its outcome good-to-excellent was significantly higher among patients in group B compared with group A. Conclusion: Short-term outcomes of the applied 3-in-1 procedure are promising for improvement of symptoms secondary to FBSS and may ultimately prove to be recommended as the therapeutic modality for such a challenging clinical problem. (Full text available online at www.medpharm.tandfonline.com/ojaa) South Afr J Anaesth Analg 2017; DOI: 10.1080/22201181.2017.1287835

Author Biographies

Ahmed Abdalla Mohamed, Cairo University
Faculty of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology & ICU Cairo University Cairo
Atef Kamel Salama, Cairo University
Faculty of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology & ICU Cairo University Cairo
Ahmed Essam Salem, Tanta University
Faculty of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology & ICU Tanta University Tanta
Ashraf El Gallad, Zagazig University
Faculty of Medicine Department of Neurosurgery Zagazig University Zagazig
Published
2017-05-04
Section
Review Articles